An app to help reading in the 21st century

Celebration of the opening of new library at Boothroyd Primary Academy, Dewsbury.
Mudasser Auaz, Natalie Egbrece, Mandi Reeve, Alesha Hussain, Danyal Hussain.

Celebration of the opening of new library at Boothroyd Primary Academy, Dewsbury. Mudasser Auaz, Natalie Egbrece, Mandi Reeve, Alesha Hussain, Danyal Hussain.

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Boothroyd Primary Academy moved into the 21st century with the opening of its new library.

The school has introduced an app which allows parents to log on and reserve books for their child.

The App was introduced to the primary school by ICT co-ordinator James Fauler and was put into use with the official opening on Friday.

The launch coincided with World Book Week, and to celebrate the school held workshops with authors Rebecca Colby and Rebecca Longbottom, who spoke to the children about their books as well as joining in the celebrations.

Mandi Reeve, the library manager, has been in charge of the project since she was appointed in September.

This is the first time that the school has re-constructed the library, with Mrs Reeves, having to manually add the 4,500 books to the app.

She said: “It’s such a valuable learning tool.

“It is so easy for all the parents to fit it in with their everyday lives, and allows them to get involved with their kids’ learning.

“By allowing parents to monitor their children’s reading it encourages them to read in their spare time.”

Mrs Reeve also spoke about how the school celebrated World Book Week.

She said: “It was such a great opportunity to celebrate. The library opened on April 11, but we didn’t cut the ribbon until the book day on Friday”.

“The children came dressed up as book characters, and we held a ‘books and buns day’ where parents could come along and read with their children whilst eating cakes. By improving our library I’m hoping it will encourage everyone to use such a resourceful tool”.

Mrs Reeve, has worked at the school for 11 years now and before working as the library manager she worked as the ‘Visually impaired resource technician’.