Family and friends raise £13K in memory of Steven

fUNDRAISERS: Members of the Birstall Irish Nash and the Jordan family raised funds for charity
fUNDRAISERS: Members of the Birstall Irish Nash and the Jordan family raised funds for charity
0
Have your say

Family and friends of a man who died from cancer have raised £13,000 for charity in his memory.

Steven Jordan died in 2015 while undergoing treatment for cancer at St James’s Hospital in Leeds.

His wife Anne and their daughters Jennifer and Carly Jordan, along with members of Birstall Nash, where Mr Jordan was a club member, decided to take on the challenge of walking 10 miles of the Cleveland Way to raise money for the Yorkshire Cancer Centre Appeal.

And they managed to raise £10,000.

Terry Nunns of the Birstall Nash said: “With Steven whenever something was needed he was one of the ones who helped.

“He was a lovely guy, very generous and was always giving rather than taking.

“Anything charitable and he would be there.”

Other fundraising events were also organised in Mr Jordan’s memory.

More than £1,700 was raised thanks to the efforts of Carly and a friend who completed the Great North Run.

And Batley Rugby League Club carried out a match day collection, while Liverpool and Victoria Rugby League Clubs also donated funds.

For 15 years Mr Jordan himself helped raise funds for charities through the Birstall Nash’s annual walks.

Money raised through the walks has helped children’s hospice throughout Yorkshire .

Club members estimatee the walks will have raised £60,000 for various charities.

A representative of the Yorkshire Cancer Centre was presented with cheques by Mrs Jordan and both Jennifer and Carly.

Mr Nunns said the club are already planning further events to support the charity.

He said: “The guys said after the last one we did for Steven that we would have a break.

“But I think we will be returning to do another for the Yorkshire Cancer Centre Appeal.“

The Yorkshire Cancer Centre Appeal supports patients at St James’s Insitute of Oncology in Leeds.

Each day it will treat 2,000 patients, most of whom receive a cancer diagnosis.

Money raised through events will go towards helping fund specialised equipment, advice, support and events for patients in Leeds.