Ravensthorpe driver shocked to be asked if he supports al-Qaeda

SHOCK CLAIM: Mohammed Younis was told by a police officer that the black cloth he had dangling from his car suggested that he suported al-Qaeda. (d22031244)
SHOCK CLAIM: Mohammed Younis was told by a police officer that the black cloth he had dangling from his car suggested that he suported al-Qaeda. (d22031244)
0
Have your say

A DRIVER was asked if he supported terrorists when he was pulled over by police.

Mohammed Younis was told by the officer who stopped him that a black cloth he had fixed to the back of his car was a sign that he backed al-Qaeda.

But the 29-year-old said the suggestion was nonsense and that the cloth was simply a good luck charm.

Mr Younis was driving along Huddersfield Road through Ravensthorpe when he was told by a police officer to pull over because he was not wearing a seatbelt.

He parked in a nearby petrol station and spoke to the officer who made the claim.

He said: “I pulled into the petrol station and as I went over to the police car the officer said, ‘Do you support al-Qaeda?’

“It came as a big shock to me. I was really scared that this guy was going to make something up and take me away.

“He said it was because I had a black cloth hanging from my car, but that cloth is there as a good luck charm.”

Mr Younis, of North Road, said he was now concerned that other people might think he supports the notorious terrorist organisation because he has the cloth hanging on his car.

“My concern is that many people might be thinking that the black cloth is a sign of supporting al-Qaeda, but that is not true,” Mr Younis said.

“If someone is wearing black clothing and has a black car does that mean they are supporting al-Qaeda? I think its very silly for people to think that.

“This was direct discrimination against me. This officer must be saying this to many other Asians, making up silly things.

“It might be a joke to him but it’s not a joke to me.”

When Mr Younis asked the officer where he had heard that black cloths were a sign of supporting al-Qaeda, he was told that the officer had heard it from a former colleague.

After leaving the petrol station, Mr Younis went to Dewsbury police station where he spoke to a senior officer about what had happened.

Police said they had not yet received a formal complaint.

A police spokesman said: “Once we receive a complaint from Mr Younis we will look into the matter.”